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2018 Annual Conference Breakout Sessions
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Workshops that meet ethics and supervision requirements

Ethics

Breakout #1ab- Ethics for Social Workers, Alcohol and Drug Counselors, and Other Counselors

Breakout #10bc- Ethics and Risk Management in the New Era of Social Work

Breakout #26de- 9 Major Problem Practice Areas for Mental Health Therapist

 

Supervision

Breakout #2ab- Program Development: Building programs from the ground up

Breakout #3ab- Trauma-Informed Clinical Supervision

Breakout #25de- Clinical Supervision: Putting theory into practice

Breakout #35ef- Supervision: Linking Trust –based Management to the Five Factor Model of Personality

 

Day 1 - November 8

Breakout A and B: 11:45 a.m. – 3 p.m. (3-Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #1ab- Ethics for Social Workers, Alcohol and Drug Counselors, and Other Counselors

Presenter: Geoff Wilson, LCSW, LCADC4

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (Meets Kentucky and Ohio ethics requirements)

Room: Columbus, 2nd Floor

 

Practicing from a sound ethical foundation is the cornerstone of providing care for the clients we serve. This workshop will provide attendees with an in-depth review of ethical principles related to the social work and alcohol and drug counselor fields. A review of NASW ethical principles along with examples of unethical behavior will be highlighted. Discussion of specific guidelines in Kentucky and Ohio will be provided. The concept of boundaries in practice and addressing dual-relationships for social workers and counselors will be addressed, as well as the importance of self-care and avoiding provider burn-out.

 

Geoff Wilson is a licensed clinical social worker and licensed clinical alcohol and drug counselor. He has been practicing in the mental health and substance abuse treatment fields in Kentucky for over 24 years. He currently is in full-time private practice with The Offices of Paul Dalton in Lexington, KY where he treats adults, adolescents, and families. He was previously employed with The Ridge Behavioral Health System in Lexington, KY for 14 years, where he held the positions of Director of Addiction Services, Director of Business Development, and most recently as Director of Clinical Operations for their 110-bed inpatient psychiatric and chemical dependency treatment hospital and their outpatient department. He served as the president of the Kentucky Adolescent Substance Abuse Consortium for over 10 years. In 2004, he received the Robert Straus Award for Outstanding Service in the Field of Substance Abuse Treatment in Kentucky and in 2008 was appointed by Governor Steve Beshear to the Kentucky Board of Alcohol and Drug Counselors. In 2013, he was selected by NASW-KY as the Social Worker of the Year.

 

Breakout #2ab- Program Development: Building programs from the ground up

Presenter: Ami Peacock, LISW-S

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (meets supervision requirement)

Room: Franklin, 2nd Floor

 

Have you been wanting to start a new program in your community or at work, but aren’t sure where to begin? This workshop will help you learn ways to organize your thoughts and ideas in order to implement a new program. Participants will learn ways to break down the program development process into concrete steps through lecture, experiential activities, and guided small group discussions. Evaluation methods that help lead to successful programs will be discussed.

 

Ami Peacock, MSW, LISW-S (’93), Director of Mentor Central Ohio, a Division of Big Brothers Big Sisters. Before that she was the Manager for the Mount Carmel West Healthy Living Center, where she created and developed bilingual health and wellness services for vulnerable communities. This center addresses issues of infant mortality, obesity, and chronic disease management. Throughout Ami's career, she has created bilingual outreach prevention programs for communities at agencies including Big Brothers Big Sisters, St. Vincent Family Centers, and MetroHealth Cancer Center in Cleveland. She served as a hurricane relief social worker in Miami, Florida and lived in Argentina for a year teaching English to youth while doing community development work.

 

Breakout #3ab- Trauma-Informed Clinical Supervision

Presenter: Sherri Harper Woods, PhD, LISW-S

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (meets supervision requirement)

Room: Westerville, 1st Floor

 

This is an interactive workshop that will assist the social worker in examining clinical supervision through a trauma-informed lens. Attendees will review tools that can instantly change the way they provide supervision.

 

Dr. Sherri Harper Woods is an assistant professor at Youngstown State University in the Social Work Department. She is an EMDR trained licensed independent social worker with a supervision designation. Dr. Woods is a journey coach who walks with others on their journey toward hope, healing, and health.

 

Breakout #4ab- Radically Open-Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO-DBT): Implications for social isolation as a public health crisis

Presenters: Jimmy Portner, LISW-S, LICDC-CS and Nathan Tomcik, PhD

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Powell, 1st Floor

 

This presentation introduces the novel evidence-based treatment of Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO-DBT). Implications for clinical practice and community level interventions will be explored and discussed. RO-DBT is a type of cognitive behavioral therapy developed by Dr. Thomas R. Lynch for disorders of overcontrol (OC). OC is a type of personality or coping style that can be identified in early childhood and can lead to social isolation, poor interpersonal functioning, and severe and difficult-to-treat mental health problems, such as anorexia nervosa, autism spectrum disorders, chronic depression, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

 

Jimmy Portner is the Director of the Intensive Treatment Division at the Columbus Ohio Veterans Administration. He is a certified trainer and provider of RO-DBT. Jimmy serves as an adjunct professor for the OSU College of Social Work where he received both his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in social work. Dr. Nathan Tomcik is the Director of Outpatient Behavioral Health and Chief Psychologist at the Columbus VA. He received his PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Tennessee in 2005 and completed his postdoctoral work in community mental health with an emphasis in dual diagnosis treatment in underserved communities. He is currently working with Dr. Thomas Lynch in training and dissemination of Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy.


Breakout A- 11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m. (1.5 Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #5a- How Social Work Advocacy and Community Organization Saved 748 HUD Subsidized Units

Presenters: Alice Skirtz, PhD, LISW-S, Josh Spring, BSW, LSW, and Dalton King, BSW, LSW

1.5 CEUs for social work

Room: Worthington, 1st Floor

 

Following the 2017 NASW Ohio Annual Conference workshop on the then imminent loss of 748 HUD subsidized units housing 2,500 low income residents and the social work interventions of advocacy and organization of tenants’ councils, this workshop recounts successful resolution of the case and examines social work practice modalities of community organization, advocacy, and collaboration that empowered tenants, saved subsidies for all units, and prevented displacement. The presenters will review “best practices” for community organization and advocacy in a market-driven economy and use of coalition-based community organization and advocacy in concert with clients and community.

 

Alice Skirtz, PhD, LISW-S, has more than 45 years of social work in direct practice, supervision and administration, and advocacy and community activism with poor populations and neighborhoods. She is author of "Econocide: Elimination of the Urban Poor" published by NASW Press. Josh Spring, BSW, LSW, has been Executive Director of the Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition since 2009, a coalition of more than 70 organizations serving those who experience homelessness, neighborhood groups, and individual advocates working to eradicate homelessness. Experienced in advocacy and community activism, he previously worked with permanent and supportive housing programs. Dalton King, BSW, LSW, formerly a Public Ally placed with the Homeless Coalition, returned to the Coalition with his BSW to work with "Streetvibes" vendors and community organizing with tenants' councils.

 

Breakout #6a- The Application of Four Spiritual Domains to Social Work Practice: A practical approach

Presenter: Lisa Skeens, PhD, LISW

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Dublin, 1st Floor

 

The term "Spirituality" is often misunderstood. Social workers are encouraged to use spirituality in practice, but many times are unsure how to apply it. This workshop will teach definitions of spirituality, discuss research studies about spiritual practice, present four domains of spirituality, and introduce a variety of spiritual approaches to use in the engagement, assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, and termination stages of practice. The workshop will present a baseline of how social workers can begin to assess and implement spiritual approaches in their everyday work.

 

Dr. Skeens has been a professor in the field of social work for 15 years and is currently a full-time faculty member at Ohio University-Lancaster and has a therapy practice in Dublin, Ohio. She has had over 23 years of practice experience in mental health and child welfare. Her areas of practice expertise and research include: holistic practices in mental health, trauma and anxiety disorders, multicultural practice, mental health barriers for migrant farm workers and indigenous populations. She is a certified hypnotherapist and has expertise in guided imagery and visualization techniques.

 

Breakout #7a- Self-Care or Bust

Presenter: Heidi Mercer, MSSA, LSW

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Delaware, 1st Floor

 

Self-care is a practice social workers need to embed into their routine to maintain a professional demeanor and practice in the field. Research suggests social workers last a mere seven years in the field. Self-care is often not spoken about at the collegiate level in any great depth. This workshop talks about what’s happening in the field, discusses signs and symptoms of compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma, and suggests some coping mechanisms and ideas for self-compassion and care.

 

Heidi Mercer, MSSA, LSW, is an avid proponent of self-care and has been a social worker for over 10 years focusing on children, youth, and family work with both national and international experience. Her interests are self-care, particularly for professionals, and trauma-informed care. She is now a professor at Bluffton University.

 

Breakout #8a- Millennials and Generation Z: Mental health and therapy

Presenter: Chanté Meadows

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Capitol, 1st Floor

 

Millennials are experiencing new challenges, from career and economic uncertainty to mountains of debt. Generation Z has experienced the widespread usage of the Internet from a young age; Generation Z is typically thought of as being comfortable with technology and interacting on social media for a significant portion of their socializing. Technology and social media ahve made it harder to live authentic and vulnerable lives. Technology and social media makes everything easy and quick. When a therapist says, “It’s a process,” what does that mean for the concept fast and simple. What does therapy look like for these generations?

 

Chanté Meadows is a licensed clinical social worker, sex therapist, and clinical supervisor in the state of Ohio. Chanté has worked for over 10 years in various positions and roles in the mental health field. She worked with the college population at The Ohio State University Counseling Center for over five years. Chanté now works part-time as a medical social worker at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. But her primary work is owner and private practitioner at Meadows Counseling Group. She manages a caseload of diverse clients with presenting issues such as women’s issues, sexual issues, relationships, anxiety, depression, and more.

 

Breakout #9a- Social Workers as Champions of Compassion: Experiences teaching an online social work course on compassion in social justice

Presenter: Diane M. Wright, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Ohio, 2nd Floor

 

Drawing on her experience teaching an online social work course called “Compassion, Empathy and Forgiveness in Social Justice”, this workshop will highlight recent research on compassion, empathy, and forgiveness, and the important role they play in social work in a wide variety of social work settings. Workshop participants will learn tools and concepts they can use in both their professional and personal lives, including effective processes for compassionate communication, stakeholder analysis, and structured processes for forgiveness.

 

Diane Wright, LISW-S, is the Vice President of Quality Management and Compliance for Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Services, where she has worked for over 24 years. She is also an adjunct instructor in social work at Northern Kentucky University and the University of Cincinnati and an accreditation surveyor for CARF.


Breakout B and C- 1:30-3 p.m. AND 3:30-5 p.m. (3-Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #10bc- Ethics and Risk Management in the New Era of Social Work

Presenter: Dr. Gwendolyn Spencer Prater

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (meets ethics requirement)

Room: Dublin, 1st Floor

 

This session, sponsored by NASW Assurance Services (ASI), describes the most significant malpractice risks in social work today and numerous methods of mitigating and reducing one’s risk of being sued for malpractice. The workshop is intended for all settings, not just clinical social work. The presenter will define what constitutes a malpractice case; emphasize important recordkeeping issues, guidelines for supervision, and special tips for private practitioners; and provide a briefing on malpractice insurance.

 

Dr. Gwendolyn Spencer Prater received a B.A. in Sociology from Tougaloo College, an MSW from the Ohio State University, and a doctor of philosophy degree in Social Work from the University of Southern California (USC). Dr. Prater has been a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Social Work Education by the National Association of Social Workers; the W. June Simmons Distinguished Alumna Award from her alma mater, USC; and major Grantsmanship Awards from Jackson State University (JSU). She has also previously served on the Education Advisory Panel, Comptroller General of the United States Government Accounting Office, the First Vice-President and Regional Representative, NASW National Board of Directors and as a Trustee, of the NASW Insurance Trust, and in several positions for the Council on Social Work Education, including the Commission on Accreditation. She has served on editorial boards of professional social work and human service journals. Dr. Prater was the Founding Dean of the School of Social Work, and also Founding Dean of the College of Public Service at JSU incorporating the Schools of Social Work, Health Sciences (Public Health and Communicative Disorders), and Policy and Planning (Public Policy and Urban and Regional Planning). Her areas of interest and scholarly publications include health/mental health, child/family welfare, and international social welfare. Dr. Prater is currently Dean Emerita at JSU and a private consultant. She spends much of her volunteer time with the JSU Women’s Council for Philanthropy and as the AARP Mississippi State President. She is widely traveled across the world, including Africa, Europe, Asia, and Latin America, and continues to enjoy traveling near and far. Dr. Prater is married to Wesley F. Prater, M.D., and she is the proud mother of one son and one daughter. She is the doting grandmother of four grandchildren: Aden, Elison, Baleigh, and Lily Claire.

 

Breakout #11bc- Introduction to Clean Language

Presenter: Ellen Seigel, LISW

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Delaware, 1st Floor

 

Guide your clients to their most powerful inner resources – ”their personal metaphors” – with this client-centered, systematic process that helps them get unstuck, heal inner wounds, and move forward. This experiential process enhances brain neuroplasticity and will allow you to be more effective with clients: heightening your listening skills and establishing instant empathy. This process assures you that you’re working with your clients’ content, not your own stuff; takes the guesswork out of what your clients need most right now; and empowers clients to trust their inner knowing and find their own solutions.

 

Ellen Seigel, LISW, is trained in hypnotherapy, EMDR, HMR, CBT, Mindfulness, and Transpersonal communication. She is the author of “Be Happy No Matter What: 5 Steps to Inner Freedom and Handling Your Own Emotions.” She practices tailored transformative approaches to pain, angst, troubles through self appreciation to overcome adversity, and facilitating clients relaxing into their authentic self.


Breakout B- 1:30-3 p.m. (1.5 Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #12b- Food, Mood, and Mental Health

Presenter: Dr. Dee Kinney, PhD, MSW, RD

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Capitol, 1st Floor

 

How is your client’s diet impacting their mental health? Did you know that even mild dehydration can cause symptoms such as fatigue or even depression? This workshop will help to raise social workers’ awareness and increase their understanding of simple dietary changes that their clients can make to better support their mental health treatment plan.

 

Dr. Dee is a high-energy, super passionate Registered Dietitian with her Master’s degree in social work and her Doctorate in Health Promotion. She considers her MSW as her most important degree as it colors all that she does through the lens of the social worker's values and ethics. In this vein, she considers herself a "Behavioral Nutritionist". She is a full-time faculty member at Miami University here in Ohio in the Department of Education and Society, teaching in the area of kinesiology and health.

 

Breakout #13b- Leading by Example: A liberatory approach to online social work education

Presenter: Rachael Richter, MSW, ACSW, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Ohio, 2nd Floor

 

This session explores the online application of the alternative teaching and learning paradigm of liberatory pedagogy as conceptualized by bell hooks. Liberatory pedagogy is a teaching method consistent with social work values that emphasizes mutual responsibility, connection to practice, and interrogation of cultural hegemony. The research data is derived from personal experiences of the presenter and interviews with MSW policy students.

 

Rachael is an associate professor of social work at Western New Mexico University and a third-year DSW student at St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas. She has 25 years of social work practice experience and has been teaching in higher education since 1998.


Breakout #14b- Mindfulness as self-care: Inspiring yourself to flourish in a profession you love

Presenters: Jill L. Dickie, PhD, LISW-S, LICDC-CS and Liesa Conversino, MSW, LSW

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Worthington, 1st Floor

 

The increasing demands of the workplace are putting a new level of stress on social workers. In the current environment, maintaining self-care is becoming ever more difficult and workplace turnover is increasing. This workshop will focus on the use of mindfulness as a way to manage stress, increase the effectiveness of the social worker's interaction with others, and benefit the workplace through improved retention rates.

 

Jill L. Dickie, PhD, LISW-S, LICDC-CS, has enjoyed a 44-year career in social work that includes 24 years as a therapist and administrator in behavioral health and 20 years on the faculty at The University of Akron. She currently is a professor in the School of Social Work. Liesa Conversino, MSW, LSW, earned her BSW and MSW from The University of Akron. She is a part-time faculty member for The University of Akron School of Social Work and has a private practice in Stark County, specializing in helping clients integrate mindfulness and stress management into their daily lives.


Breakout #15b- Student Information Session: Connecting to BSW, MSW, and PhD programs

Room: Boardroom

This session is for anyone interested in earning a degree in social work to connect to university representatives. This session does not offer CEUs.


Breakout C- 3:30-5 p.m. (1.5-Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #16c- Creature Comforts: Human-animal interactions for a brighter future in mental health

Presenters: Aviva Vincent, MSW, LSW, Janet Hoy-Gerlach, PhD, LISW-S, and Lisa Wiborg, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Polaris Room, 1st Floor

 

Mental illness is experienced by people of all ages, genders, ethnicities, and backgrounds and can be debilitating. Evidence supports the physical, social, and psychological benefits of human-animal interaction. Animals as collaborators is increasing throughout social welfare practice and becoming a consumer’s choice for non-invasive intervention to alleviate symptoms of mental health challenges. This session will provide micro and macro practitioners with key research findings and a working understanding of the different types of collaboration (companion animal, emotional support animal, therapy animal, and psychiatric service animal). Participants will also gain a working knowledge of the benefits of human-animal interaction and engage in small group discussion of best practices.

 

Aviva Vincent earned her Master of Social Work from UConn with a concentration in Community Organizing. She is an educator and advocate for the inclusion of human-animal interaction within social work and maintains certification with Path International and Therapy Dogs International. Her current research includes exploring the biological impact animals have on humans. Janet is lead author of “Human-Animal Interaction: A Social Work Guide”. She’s been an expert witness for the U.S. Department of Justice on human-animal interaction, and co-founded/co-chairs the NASW Ohio Human-Animal Interaction Workgroup. She is a Toledo Area Humane Society board member. Her research explores benefits of emotional support animals. Lisa Wiborg is the lead medical social worker for Bella Care Hospice, Cleveland/Akron branch. She has 12 years’ direct practice experience in medical social work, private adoption, and veterinary social work. She is currently implementing an animal-assisted interventions program within Bella Care Hospice.

 

Breakout #17c- Embracing continuous improvement as part of a healthy and progressive social work practice

Presenter: Danielle P. Tong, MPH, LSW

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Westerville, 1st Floor

 

Let's shift from the dichotomous mental model of micro and macro social work to looking at our practice on a continuum. The dichotomic perspective neglects the necessary system maintenance and incremental improvements that crucially impact our clients' day-to-day existence. This talk will discuss how clinicians can look at their practice in a continuous improvement framework and make real-time adjustments using tools, such as Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Cycles. It will also discuss the workplace culture necessary to foster an agile and continuously learning organization.

 

Danielle P. Tong, owner of The Kind Elephant, is a social worker that helps organizations bring order to chaos. A practitioner of Lean Six Sigma (LSS), she advocates for the use of LSS in human services organizations to improve outcomes for clients at a better value to the community.

 

Breakout #18c- Integrating content on licensure in social work education

Presenter: Carl Brun, PhD, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Franklin, 2nd Floor

 

CSWE, ASWB, and NASW have teamed up to work with social work faculty and social work licensure professionals to develop a Curricular Guide for Regulation and Licensing, an educational tool for faculty to use when integrating content about state regulation of social work into the curriculum. The presenter is a member of an approximately 50-member national team that is writing the curricular guide. The team was divided into the nine CSWE competency areas and the presenter was on the team that centered on the competency that social workers engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice.

 

Dr. Carl Brun is a professor of social work and the Assistant Vice President for University Curricular Programs, Provost Office, Wright State University (WSU). He is the author of “A Practical Guide to Social Work Evaluation” and is a member of the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, and Marriage and Family Therapist Board.

 

Breakout #19c- Binge Eating Disorder: The most prevalent, and least understood, eating disorder

Presenter: M. Hilmar Wagner, MPH, RDN, LN

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Capitol, 1st Floor

 

An estimated 20 million women and 10 million men suffer from an eating disorder. Eating disorders have the highest mortality of all mental health disorders. Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is more common than both anorexia and bulimia combined yet often goes undetected, undiagnosed, or associated with obesity. By attending this session you will learn about Binge Eating Disorder, its causes, risks factors and vulnerable populations, practical assessment, best practice treatment approaches, resources for both the patient and professional, and various level of care options.

 

Hilmar Wagner is a registered dietitian/nutritionist (RDN) and licensed dietitian in the state of Minnesota. He has worked in the field of eating disorders for the past 12 years and currently serves as the training coordinator for nutrition services and clinical outreach specialist for The Emily Program. He has presented on a wide range of nutrition topics at local, regional, and national conferences.


Breakout #20c- The Poverty Brain: Neuroplasticity and CBT

Presenters: Michelle Kreidler, MSW, LSW and Jill L. Dickie, PhD, LISW-S, LICDC-CS

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Columbus, 2nd Floor

 

Individuals living in poverty experience mental health disorders at a higher rate than the general population. Studies have demonstrated how poverty alters brain development which can lead to maladaptive patterns of social attribution and/or elevated physiological stress. Understanding how these brain changes impact client outcomes is critical for social work professionals. Social workers must also be aware of effective interventions to help mitigate the effects of poverty. This workshop will address how individuals living in poverty see the world, barriers to effective treatment, and ways the social worker can mitigate the effects of poverty. In addition, effective evidence-based interventions will be explored.

 

Michelle Kreidler, MSW, LSW, has been a social worker for 25 years. She has experience in case management, therapy, and supervision in both behavioral health and child welfare. She is currently in private practice and working as a consultant with Aultman College’s Social Work Program. Jill L. Dickie, PhD, LISW-S, LICDC-CS, has enjoyed a 44-year career in social work that includes 24 years as a therapist and administrator in behavioral health and 20 years on the faculty at The University of Akron. She currently is a professor in the School of Social Work.


Breakout #21c- Disability Rights Ohio: What social workers should know about who we are and what we do

Presenter: Kerstin Sjoberg

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Powell, 1st Floor

 

This workshop will introduce Disability Rights Ohio as a resource tool for social workers as they work to advocate for their clients. The topics discussed will illustrate who we are, our background, the services we provide, how we advocate for our clients individually and systemically, and our outreach efforts.

 

Kerstin Sjoberg is the director of advocacy and the assistant executive director of Disability Rights Ohio (DRO). Ms. Sjoberg works with attorneys and advocates to formulate legal strategies, coordinate complex impact litigation, and contribute to policy work on behalf of DRO and its clients.


Breakout #22c- Legacy Writing 101 for Social Workers

Presenter: Ann Haas, ACSW, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Ohio, 2nd Floor

 

This workshop is designed to introduce social workers in all settings to the basics of legacy writing. Legacy writing includes ethical wills, blessings, last letters, and life review storytelling. Legacy writing offers a unique opportunity for social workers to listen to and document their clients' life stories in a therapeutic setting. Legacy writing can be a tool to help clients reflect on their life achievements, lessons learned and blessings to pass along to future generations, values and beliefs, and regrets. Often people do not feel they have legacy worthy stories, but if we don’t document them, who will?

 

Ann Haas is a retired hospital social worker and administrator who became a certified legacy facilitator in 2016. Listening to unique and heartrending stories over her career, especially when patients were facing end of life decisions, prompted her to pursue this sacred work and embrace personal legacy writing as well.


Breakout #23c- Banned but Proud: Rights and access to care for active duty transgender soldiers and potential recruits

Presenters: Jody Davis, MSW, RN, LISW and Jonah Minot, LISW

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Worthington, 1st Floor

  

The U.S. military is the single largest employer of LGBTQ people in the country. Many of those who have prior service have powerful stories of their struggles of having to hide their sexuality during Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. This presentation focuses on the current policies from the Obama and Trump administrations regarding transgender soldiers and their rights and access to care. Through videos and oral presentation, attendees will hear first-hand accounts of active duty soldiers and their fight for equality and access to care, as well as a Veteran’s story of coming out trans and her efforts to rejoin the military.

 

Jody Davis is a nurse and social worker and a mom who happens to be Transgender. Jody currently works as a therapist at Clintonville Counseling and Wellness. Jody has a beautiful daughter named Lily and is happily married to Jennifer Evans. Jody is a veteran of the Ohio Army National Guard, and is trying to reenlist. Jonah Minot, LISW, is currently the chief experience officer at the Chalmers P. Wylie Veterans Affairs Ambulatory Care Center. Jonah has been working at the VA since 2013 with various social work roles specializing in the homeless and dually-diagnosed veteran population. Jonah has also been proud to participate in LGBTQ advocacy efforts at the VA. Jonah identifies as transgender and queer and uses he/him/his pronouns.

 

Breakout #24c- Writing Your Overnight Success Story

Presenter: Dorothy Martindale, BSW, LSW

Room: Boardroom, 1st Floor

 

At NASW Ohio Chapter, we help social workers navigate their careers on the frontline, in the corner office, and anywhere in between. This workshop is designed to facilitate career reflection. Participants will learn how to write a personal strategic plan, communicate qualifications on paper and in-person, and negotiate a higher salary. This session does not offer CEUs.


Day 2 - November 9

Breakout D and E- 11:45 a.m. – 3 p.m. (3-Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #25de- Clinical Supervision: Putting theory into practice

Presenters: Amanda Frye, LISW-S and Meghan Cook, LISW, LICDC

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (meets supervision requirement)

Room: Columbus, 2nd Floor

 

This training will assist new and seasoned clinical supervisors in the social work field to identify their own supervision style and review evidenced-based theories for implementation in working with supervisees.

 

Amanda Frye, LISW-S, has a Bachelor’s in Psychology and a Master of Social Work from The University of Akron. She has been employed in the social services field for eight years. These experiences have allowed her to gain a substantial amount of knowledge in substance abuse treatment, medically assisted treatment, co-occurring disorders, and trauma. Furthermore, she also has experience in the areas of domestic violence, mental health, generational poverty, income disparities, and child and family development. She is passionate about the development of the next generation of social workers through supervision of those acquiring independent licensure and ongoing education of those currently in the field. She is an advocate for the impoverished in the community as she serves as an Ally for the Summit County Chapter of Circles, a nationwide initiative through Bridges out of Poverty with the goal to assist those in poverty to become self-sufficient. Meghan Cook is a Licensed Independent Social Worker and Licensed Independent Chemical Dependency Counselor with a Bachelor of Psychology and Social Work from Bluffton University and a Master of Social Work from the University of Akron. She has been employed with Oriana House Inc. for seven years and in the role of clinical coordinator for three years. In her time at Oriana House she has been able to gain experience in chemical dependency working in Detox at the Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health Board Crisis Center, facilitating intensive outpatient treatment groups in the Multiple Offender Program, and conducting alcohol and drug assessments. Additionally, she has gained supervisory experience while overseeing the Driver Intervention Program in Akron, the Opiate Specific Program in Akron, and the Quick Response Team for the cities of Green, Barberton/Norton, Tallmadge, Cuyahoga Falls, and Monroe Falls. She is motivated to continue to learn and grow in the chemical dependency and mental health field.


Breakout #26de- 9 Major Problem Practice Areas for Mental Health Therapists

Presenter: Glenn Karr, JD

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (meets ethics requirement)

Room: Polaris, 1st Floor

 

Glenn Karr, an attorney with decades of experience working in the health care field and with mental health therapists, will prepare you to avoid issues that can result in a complaint. This workshop prepares you to solve problems in high-risk settings. Much of the presentation is devoted to current and recently adopted licensing board rules, as well as new HIPAA rules, and their impact on your practice.

 

Glenn Karr is an attorney whose practice areas include CSWMFT Board complaint defense; guidance on types of entities - corporation, LLC, or sole proprietorship; independent contractor vs. employee issues; leases and contractual documents; practice forms review, including HIPAA issues and audits; advice on duty to protect, abuse reporting situations; other laws and rules affecting your practice; employment issues, ADA, age discrimination, unemployment compensation; non-competition issues; responding to subpoenas and court testimony; how to leave a practice and set up your own; multi-disciplinary practice issues; Medicare and Medicaid issues; and dealing with managed care plans and insurance companies. He writes the Legal Corner column in the NASW Ohio Chapter newsletter.


Breakout #27de- The Business of Therapy

Presenter: Matthew Capezzuto, PhD, LISW-S

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Ohio, 2nd Floor

 

This training is for therapists looking to run a business that is successful and fulfilling. In The Business of Therapy, attendees will learn about the foundations of starting a private practice, best practices in billing, and get a look forward at trends that will impact practice.

 

Matthew Capezzuto, PhD, LISW-S, is a clinical psychologist and clinical social worker with more than 20 years of experience in private practice. He is the founder and Executive Director of Allied Behavioral Health Services, Inc. – a multi-site behavioral health agency that serves several Northeast Ohio communities. As an administrator, he has developed vast working knowledge of the intricacies of the behavioral health care industry and the continuously evolving regulatory standards that govern the practices of behavioral health care providers. He has formally studied health care policy, public administration, and public service management, and is familiar with the projected trends in the health care industry that will impact the future practices of all behavioral health professionals. His clinical interests are primarily in treating public safety personnel, chronic pain sufferers, and forensic populations. He is interested in research on topics related to the psychology of law enforcement, functional capacity of injured workers, and behavioral health care policy.


Breakout #28de- The Choice: Fixing the marriage or to ending it well

Presenter: Margaret 'Charlie' Knerr, IMFT-S

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Franklin, 2nd Floor

 

Often our clients are in the hard place of either making the choice to end their marriage, or at times, they have no choice and their spouse has decided to end it. This seminar offers information about the emotional, financial, and legal aspects of ending a marriage in a logical, yet compassionate way. Workshop participants gain resources to help clients save the marriage if that is still possible, as well as information that could help clients end their relationship more thoughtfully.

 

Charlie Knerr has worked with couples or individuals making decisions regarding their marriage for more than 15 years. She often works with certified divorce financial planners and family attorneys to educate clients and professionals on the process of ending a marriage legally, financially, and emotionally.


Breakout #29de- Clinical Documentation: Writing Effective and Reflective Treatment Plans and Progress Notes

Presenter: LaToya Logan, MSSA, LISW-S, CCTP

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Delaware, 1st Floor

 

Clinical professionals are ethically responsible for meeting the documentation standards of their respective licensing board, as well as the level of care requirements for insurance. Understanding the requirements for such documents, while writing to reflect the therapeutic details of the session is critical to the success of all clinicians and their respective agency. Learn the key components of clinical documentation standards of treatment plans and progress notes with guided facilitation and case studies.

 

LaToya Logan has over ten years of experience in the field of social work providing supervision, training, and program evaluation. LaToya is a seasoned clinician, specializing in trauma, criminal justice, and crisis management in various settings including, but not limited to, correctional facilities, hospital, and outpatient. LaToya operates a clinical consulting company, Logan Clinical Consultations, providing clinical and administrative supervision to social workers seeking advanced licensure and human service trainings at community mental health agencies, mental health boards, and conferences. LaToya earned a bachelor in English education from Michigan State University, master in social administration from Case Western Reserve University, Certificate in Forensic Social Work, and a certificate in Nonprofit Leadership and Management. She has also completed the doctoral program at Walden University and is working toward completion of the dissertation.


Breakout D- 11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m. (1.5 Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #30d- A Royal Flush: When gambling and drugs spiral out of control

Presenter: Melinda Love, CRADC, MARS, SQP-R, CGDC

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Powell, 1st Floor

 

Gambling has a high correlation with substance use disorder (SUD). This session will focus on co-occurring gambling and substance use disorders. Participants will be educated on DSM-5 clinical diagnosis, an overview of assessment tools, and patient treatment options. Screening tools will be provided.

 

Melinda Love is the principal at New Haven Wellness Services, LLC, (NHWS). Ms. Love has 14 years’ experience in the substance use disorder field. Currently her emphasis is on medicated assisted treatment (MAT). Her past work experience included service to the criminal justice population in a community based treatment facility. Ms. Love has facilitated continue education sessions and workshops for NASW-MO for several years. Her background as a presenter has included regional and national conferences such as Fathers & Families Coalition of America, Midwest Conference on Problem Gambling and The National Conference on Addiction Disorders.


Breakout #31d- School Social Workers: Advocates for students who struggle with behavior in the classroom

Presenter: Todd Haydon, PhD, LISW

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Worthington, 1st Floor

 

School social workers are trained to assist with behavioral concerns, provide academic and classroom support, consult with teachers, and advocate for students. Advocacy skills are particularly important for those students with challenging behaviors. This hands-on workshop will provide social workers with advocacy skills for students with challenging behavior. Participants will learn several evidence-based, classroom management strategies to reduce behavioral concerns and promote positive behavior. These strategies have been researched and shown to be effective with challenging behavior in school settings. In this workshop, attendees will have numerous opportunities to practice these strategies as well as ask questions.

 

Todd Haydon, LISW, is an associate professor in the Special Education Program at the University of Cincinnati. He was a school social worker for 10 years and provided academic and classroom support and consultation with teachers and administrators. Dr. Haydon has nearly 40 publications in the area of classroom management.


Breakout #32d- Alternatives for Juvenile Domestic Violence Offenders in the U.S.

Presenter: Xinyi Situ

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Westerville, 1st Floor

 

This session will first give a brief introduction to the current situation of juvenile domestic violence (DV) offenders in the United States, including the type of violence, negative effects, recidivism rates, etc. Then, traditional methods of addressing those issues (juvenile detention mainly) and their adverse consequences will be introduced. After that, alternative approaches in some states will be explored, and programmatic information useful in other jurisdictions will be presented. Finally, programs such as PAR (Protective Action Response) and CALM (Coordinated Approach to Low-risk Misdemeanors) will be presented to provide guidance for better understanding and assisting DV youths in the future.

 

Xinyi Situ, MSSA, LL.M., is a research assistant with The Begun Center for Violence Prevention, Research and Education at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. His research interests include juvenile justice and crime prevention, focusing on alternatives to mass incarceration and improving relationships between police and the community.


Breakout #33d- HIV: What social workers should know

Presenters: Naimah O'Neal, MSW, LSW and Bryan Jones

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency 

Room: Dublin, 1st Floor

 

Although HIV is moving to a manageable chronic illness, stigma is still fueling fear, misinformation and fostering undue stress on people living with HIV. Licensed social workers should always be on the hunt for the most up-to-date information available share with their client/patient. The workshop will include current information about the Undetectable=Untransmittable campaign, HIV criminalization and HIV first language.

 

Naimah O'Neal is a licensed medical social worker at Circle Health Services where she works with people living with HIV and the interdisciplinary medical teams that provide care and support. Prior to this she worked as an HIV Test Counselor. Naimah has served as a member of the Ryan White HIV Planning Council several times since 2003. She is an experienced public speaker and has focused on sexual and reproductive health, supporting mothers living with HIV, HIV disclosure, and advocacy and housing issues. Naimah has blogged, written articles and educated on the journey of living with HIV, how stigma impacts people who are marginalized, social work policy issues, and the complexity of HIV disclosure and how to approach it. Bryan Jones has been thriving with AIDS for over 34 years and has been an advocate and activist for half that time. He is a National Founding member of the international Undetectable=Untransmittable campaign, U=U, a voting member of both The Cleveland Planning Council and the Ryan White regional advisory group. He has presented both nationally on mass incarceration, housing instability, and HIV. Mr. Jones was very instrumental in the forming of the Ohio health modernization movement whose mission is to modernize the HIV non-disclosure laws in Ohio. He has been apart of the Sero project, HIV Is Not A Crime. Bryan also has performed his one-man theatrical piece entitled AIDS and I Die Slowly throughout the U.S and abroad. He is a proud Rattler and Graduate of Florida A&M University with a B.S in Broadcast Journalism.


Breakout #34d- Child Sexual Abuse: Answering 8 crucial questions

Presenter: Pamela J. Miller, JD, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Capitol, 1st Floor

 

Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a relatively new field of study and has been the subject of scientific inquiry for about 30 years. Although tremendous progress has been made since the late 1980s, numerous myths and misunderstandings about CSA persist among lay-persons and professionals. This training will answer eight crucial questions about CSA – regarding sexual abuse disclosures and memory in young children, the significance of findings by Child Protective Services and Child Advocacy Centers, and visits between offender-parents and children in foster care. Participants will receive copies of child sexual abuse fact sheets with extensive references that they can use in their practice and distribute to community partners. This intermediate level training is applicable to both micro practice and macro administration or policy work – in child mental health, child welfare, and services to children and families.

 

Pamela J. Miller is a social worker and attorney focusing on children's issues including child maltreatment, childhood poverty, and early childhood mental health. She is the founder and Executive Director of the Children's Justice Project and maintains a psychotherapy practice treating young children for severe abuse and neglect. Pamela is the NASW Ohio Region 6 Director and serves on the board of NASW Ohio. She also serves on national committees for APSAC and the Center for Child Policy, and on the Children and Families Council for the City of Cincinnati.


Breakout E and F- 1:30-3 p.m. AND 3:30-5 p.m. (3-Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #35ef- Supervision: Linking Trust-Based Management to the Five Factor Model of Personality

Presenters: Linda Helm, PhD, LISW-S and Richard Boettcher, PhD, LISW-S

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (meets supervision requirement)

Room: Westerville, 1st Floor

 

This workshop offers a review of the principles of trust-based management and how to establish an environment in the work place in which “trust” is the dominant characteristic of organizational culture.  Additionally, this workshop will show how the personality system of the supervisor-manager actively contributes to the development and sustainment of a culture of trust.   The Five Factor Model of Personality (FFM) will be employed to demonstrate the influence of personality on org. culture.  Participants will be invited to take a brief test to assess their congruence with the Five Factor Model.

 

Dr. Linda Helm is the program manager for the University Partnership Child Welfare Training program at the Ohio State University’s College of Social Work. Her research interests are in the evaluation of child maltreatment services and the impact of social work supervision on quality of practice, social work leadership development, supervision, and supervision designation license. She provides continuing education training for social workers on Child Welfare Practice, Supervision, and Ethics. Richard Boettcher is a social work educator with an extensive background in the practice fields of mental health, child welfare and social service administration. After serving as Director of the School of Social Work at the University of Missouri-Columbia and Dean of the Ohio State University College of Social Work, Dr. Boettcher returned to teaching courses on social administration, supervision and human resource management, resource acquisition, and ethics at OSU. Although retired from full-time teaching, he continues to be professionally involved as an educator and researcher. A long-time active member of NASW, Dr. Boettcher was honored recently by the Association as a “Social Work Pioneer.”


Breakout #36ef- How Children Grow in Garden Therapy

Presenter: Sarah E. Macovitz, MSSA, LSW

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Powell, 1st Floor

 

Garden therapy is the engagement of a person or group in gardening and plant-based activities facilitated by a trained therapist or social worker to achieve specific therapeutic goals. The visual aesthetics of plants are known to elicit feelings of inner peace, which generates positive emotions promoting open dialogue in therapy. Direct contact with plants guides the participant’s focus away from stress enhancing their overall quality of life. Garden therapy is an active process which occurs in the context of an established treatment plan.

 

A graduate of Youngstown State University's Social Work Program and Case Western Reserve University's Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Sarah has a wealth of experience in the field of social work. She began her career as a domestic violence advocate, school-based case manager and therapist, community organizer and more. She is highly involved in Mahoning and Trumbull Counties community garden movement. She was recently accepted to present at the American Horticulture Associations National Conference in Denver, Colorado on her Therapeutic Gardening Program.


Breakout E- 1:30-3 p.m. ( 1.5 Hour Workshops)

Breakout #37e- May you be blessed with discomfort: Social workers as advocates

Presenter: Linda Gatten Butler, ACSW, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Capitol, 1st Floor

 

Social justice is the social work core value that demonstrates that advocacy is a timely, critical, and empowering action verb. Our commitment to changing systems benefiting clients and raising our collective voices is central to our profession. “May you be blessed with discomfort” encourages participants to: 1) understand what implicit bias is; 2) learn to address injustice and promote social justice aligned with social work core values; and 3) discuss our own cultures and backgrounds, then acknowledge the impact of systems of oppression. This session is oriented to macro and micro practice.

 

Linda Gatten Butler, MSW, ACSW, LISW-S, is a senior fundraising consultant and President of Butler Consulting since 1994, specializing in grant seeking, training and managing services, with 45+ years of clinical, administrative, and fundraising experience for over 200 non-profit, for-profit and public agencies nationwide, primarily in Ohio’s Miami Valley.


Breakout #38e- Exploring Resilience in Small Communities

Presenter: Laura Gaines, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Worthington, 1st Floor

 

What does it mean for a small community (workplace, church, social organization, foundation) to be resilient? Explore topics of social and community resilience looking at the existing literature and a year-long resilience project in a local faith community. Using focus group research a local church explores their own understanding of resilience along with methods to recognize and grow their abilities. Art, writing, music, testimonials, and sermons are also used to permeate the theme of resilience throughout the community. How can we generalize these findings to other communities? How might the theme of resilience enrich your communities?

 

Trainer and researcher with a focus on resilience as an individual and community skill. Career experiences include child and adolescent therapist for over 20 years. Her trainings focus on child development, child welfare, mental health, developmental disabilities, ethics, trauma-informed care, resilience, and each person’s individual solutions.


Breakout #39e- Social Work's Vital Role in Primary Care

Presenter: Pamela Lynch, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Dublin, 1st Floor

 

Social workers have unique skills that are needed by primary care practitioners. In the Department of Veterans Affairs social workers have worked in primary care clinics since 2000. The presenter created and will share a Primary Care Social Work Practice Model that is used to assess and treat psychosocial conditions that create barriers to optimal health care. Participants will demonstrate the use of the model through case scenarios. We will discuss the benefits of having social workers co-located in the clinic as integral partners in the practice of primary health care, as well as challenges to establishing social work practices in primary care.

 

Pam Lynch has worked as a primary care social work case manager at the Cleveland VA Medical Center for 16 of the past 19 years. She developed a practice model for social work in primary care in 2002. Pam participated on the Systems Re-design Committee in 2009 when the VA redesigned primary care using the medical home principles. She led a team of social workers to design the Social Work Model for PACT that was implemented nationally in 2010. She has collaborated with national leadership to train VA social workers in the model and pursue evaluation of the efficacy of the model. At this time, she works in primary care at the Cleveland VA Medical Center and is the associate director of social work for the Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education. She is also an adjunct faculty at the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.


Breakout F- 3:30-5 p.m. (1.5-Hour Workshops)

 

Breakout #40f- Social Work Assistants: Championing them in your agency

Presenter: Tressa Arnold, LISW-S, HS-BCP and Scott Gatton, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Franklin, 2nd Floor

 

This presentation will define the use of multiple license holders within an agency, specifically outlining the scope of practice of the Social Work Assistant. Learners will gain insight to the pyramid of skills and decision-making within the social work profession. Participants will apply knowledge directly to their organization and brainstorm with others the pyramid of skills approach to services.

 

Tressa Arnold holds a Master of Social Work from the Ohio State University. Tressa has 16 years of experience in the medical social work field including home health, inpatient rehab, hospital, emergency room, and outpatient social work direct services. She has led Central Ohio Technical College Human Services Program for nine years.Scott Gatton holds a Masters in Social Science Administration from Case Western Reserve, and a Masters of Divinity from Ashland Theological Seminary. Scott has 27 years of experience in social work, specializing in outpatient mental health and geriatrics. Currently, he is an adjunct professor at Mt.Vernon Nazarene University and, an outpatient therapist at Behavioral Health Care Partners of Central Ohio (BHP), as well as the practicum supervisor/coordinator at BHP.


Breakout #41f- Post Election: How to hold elected officials accountable

Presenter: David Maywhoor

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Polaris, 1st Floor

 

This workshop will provide participants with real world techniques for holding newly elected officials (as well as those who are incumbents) to the words they spoke on the campaign trail. Join long-time registered lobbyist, David Maywhoor for a fast-paced session as he reviews the lessons learned and challenges faced in the sometimes hectic world of Ohio’s Statehouse.

 

David Maywhoor has 40+ years’ experience in the nonprofit arena, beginning as a Headstart teacher in the rural northwest Ohio town of Neptune, managing ever more complex local and statewide social service agencies and policy advocacy organizations. His focus centers on bringing the consumer voice into the community decision making process.


Breakout #42f- Motivation: The one simple daily strategy for daily success

Presenter: Virginia I. Clagg, MSW, LSW

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Columbus, 2nd Floor

 

We live in a world of chaos and in the helping profession we often find ourselves lacking the motivation to trudge through another day of fixing people, communities, and institutions. If you could have one daily ritual to keep you motivated and energized to do life with pizzazz, would you do it? Motivation and being mindful are the latest buzz-words in our industry but how does one marry the two for super productivity? One simple answer can be the secret to super success.

 

Virginia graduated from the Ohio State University in 2000 and has been in the field of social work for 18 years. Virginia has twin boys 12 years old, is recently engaged, and enjoys hiking, reading, and anything outdoors. Currently Virginia works for Recovery Works in Worthington. Virginia is also in private practice as a certified hypnotherapist at Northwoods Clinic in Worthington. Virginia recently returned to graduate school in January 2018 and is also working on a PhD in Psychology.


Breakout #43f- Recognizing and responding to child torture: A new category of child maltreatment

Presenter: Pamela J. Miller, JD, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Capitol, 1st Floor

 

Child torture is gaining recognition as a distinct form of child abuse that requires specialized assessment and response. While there is ample research on politically motivated torture, which may include child victims, there has been almost no research on child torture as a domestic, intrafamilial phenomenon. A watershed article by Knox and colleagues (2014) describes the unique features of child torture within families and proposes a clinical definition. This training will introduce the psychological dynamics of child torture in families, give participants an opportunity to practice applying the definition of child torture to case studies, and propose responsive actions for a variety of social work roles involved in the protection and clinical treatment of children.

 

Pamela J. Miller is a social worker and attorney focusing on children's issues including child maltreatment, childhood poverty, and early childhood mental health. She is the founder and Executive Director of the Children's Justice Project and maintains a psychotherapy practice treating young children for severe abuse and neglect. Pamela is the NASW Ohio Region 6 Director and serves on the board of NASW Ohio. She also serves on national committees for APSAC and the Center for Child Policy, and on the Children and Families Council for the City of Cincinnati.


Breakout #44f- Private Practice: Tricky business

Presenter: Alvin Mares, PhD, LISW-S

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency

Room: Worthington, 1st Floor

 

A thoughtful discussion of important topics pertaining to the “tricky business” of private practice, illustrated by the experiences of Mares Cares Counseling, LLC and other private practices in attendance. These topics include balancing business savvy with clinical excellence; contrasting entrepreneur vs. employee mindsets; trade-offs between independence and income; being a “jack of all trades”; the pioneer-like experience of private practice; the life cycle of a small-business; and resources for starting, growing, or expanding a private practice. The workshop presenter, Alvin Mares, has served as business manager and therapist with Mares Cares Counseling, LLC since its inception five years ago.

 

Alvin Mares successfully transitioned over the past five years from full-time academic work (teaching, writing, and service) to full-time private practice (business management and clinical counseling). He is interested in both sharing his and wife Trisha’s experience establishing Mares Cares Counseling, LLC and in learning from others in private practice.


Breakout #45f- Cancelled

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