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2017 Annual Conference Breakout Sessions
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Day 1- November 16

Day 2- November 17

 

Day 1- November 16

Breakout A and B: 11:45 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

3-Hour Workshops


Breakout #1ab- The Legal Corner of Mental Health: 9 problem areas facing therapists

Presenter: Glenn Karr

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets ethics requirement

 

Glenn Karr, an attorney with decades of experience working in the health care field and with mental health therapists, will prepare you to avoid problems that can result in a complaint. This workshop prepares you to solve problems in high-risk settings. Much of the presentation is devoted to current and recently adopted licensing board rules, as well as new HIPAA rules, and their impact on your practice.


Breakout #2ab- Personal Safety in Social Work

Presenter: Dan Elliot

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This interactive presentation addresses the personal safety risks and challenges associated with social work practice. It will provide strategies for social workers to reduce risk when they encounter challenging or potentially threatening situations that involve upset, emotionally charged, or angry clients or others they may have contact with. Some of the topics covered are The Four “A’s” of Safety, reading clients’ behavior and how they read ours, deescalation of emotional states, and environmental safety awareness. The workshop offers tools for assessment of risk and best practices of violence prevention and intervention in social work and application in personal life.

 

Dan Elliot is a cooperative communication specialist with over 20 years’ experience. He provides insight and strategies for communicating more clearly, coping with stress, and setting powerful boundaries. Dan prepares professionals who come in contact with upset, angry, or emotionally charged clients to be safe and productive in challenging situations.


Breakout #3ab- Understanding Suicide: The fundamentals of theory, intervention, and treatment of suicidal clients

Presenter: Paula Rymer

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Understanding the language, techniques, and theories regarding suicidal behaviors is imperative for effective treatment with clients. Terminology or language helps clinicians to gain a higher level of intuitiveness on where your client is at while in a crisis state. Understanding how a suicide attempt and how death by suicide becomes an option for so many people in emotional pain is key to treatment effectiveness. Thomas Joine’s Interpersonal theory of suicide and Rudd’s Fluid Vulnerability theory explore how people become intent on death by their own hand. Critical answers on how to treat and intervene with clients can better happen by understanding why and how people become suicidal. Suicidal ideation can be fleeting as well as chronic which increases those unknown factors for the clinician. Theories of what creates a suicidal crisis have developed over recent years and given insight to effective treatment for the client in crisis. Risk and warning signs are also key to understanding changes in a client’s behavior and mindset. Understanding the different signs of risk and warning can lead to earlier interventions with the client as well. Presently, the effective treatments that have empirically proven to work consist of Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) and The Assessment and Management of Suicidality (AMSR). These are clinician- and client-based interventions that have changed the traditional approaches that have been the past clinical standard. Presently other techniques such as Cognitive Behavioral and Dialectical Behavioral therapies are utilized to intervene with a client in crisis. Being able to guide clients in the most positive directions for additional resources is imperative. Helping a client to regain balance after a crisis period is crucial to making progress in treatment. A client’s continuity of care and engagement to help maintain safety are key in the treatment of the suicidal mind.

 

Paula Rymer is currently teaching at Marshall University, Huntington, WV in the Master of Social Work program. She is currently enrolled at the University of Southern California in the DSW program. Ms. Rymer obtained her MSW at University of Kentucky. She has spent 14 years studying suicidology and has worked with world-renown suicidologist Dr. Julie Cerel, University of Kentucky and Dr. Melinda Moore, Eastern Kentucky University for more than seven years. Ms. Rymer has conducted research on suicide bereavement and presented over 100 presentations in regards to suicide and traumatic bereavement.


Breakout #4ab- Being A Great Supervisor: The core skills

Presenter: Norman F. Shub

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets supervision requirement

 

In this approach to supervision the encounter between the supervisor and the supervisee is the ground for the supervisee beginning to understand more clearly how to function as a much higher level professional. Additionally, this model proffers a process of change which can be used by the supervisee to help maximize their own growth and as a part of the supervisee’s ability to change and learn new skills.

 

Norman Shub is an author, teacher and psychotherapist who is a leader in the guiding of individuals, couples, families and communities toward solutions. His clear and articulate approach has earned him the distinctions of master teacher and psychotherapy trainer. Norman’s pioneering work in psychotherapy is reflected in his REAL Press Publications, which are used by therapists at numerous universities and institutes around the world. For more than 35 years, Norman has been clinical director of Gestalt Associates and the Gestalt Institute of Central Ohio. He also served on the editorial board of several professional journals.


Breakout A- 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

1.5 Hour Workshops


Breakout #5a- Advanced Generalist: Making your way in macro practice

Presenter: Arika Lycan

1.5 CEUs for social work

 

Shaping your career as a macro social worker can be a daunting task. Many resources in the social work field are directed toward clinical practitioners, and most of the world thinks of clinical practice when imagining social work. This session encourages participants interested in and actively in a macro career to think outside the box when creating their career path. Tips, tools, and advice on making a rewarding, interesting career in macro practice will be shared, as well as thoughts on building your social worker identity in a world geared toward clinical social workers.

 

Arika Lycan, LMSW, CNP has been defying social work career tracks for 10+ years. Working in a variety of community-based settings, her work spans from volunteer management to outreach, from membership and retention to case management. Arika brings candor, humor, and positivity to her work, which always serves her well!


Breakout #6a- Moms & Methadone

Presenter: Melinda D. Love

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This presentation will address the growing prevalence of opioid use disorder with a focus on women and the unique set of circumstances for pregnant women. This includes subsequent child endangerment hotline reporting, counselor/client advocacy for this population, case studies, and additional resources.

 

Melinda D. Love has been a substance use disorder counselor in Missouri for 10+ years. She serves clients admitted into a methadone clinic which led to passionate advocacy for moms on methadone. This topic has been presented at the NASW Missouri State Symposium and with other regional and national audiences in hopes of building effective service to patients. #NoStigma


Breakout #7a- Saying NO to Fat Shaming: How body acceptance can influence anxiety management

Presenter: Levana Slabodnick

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This workshop will explore how fat phobia is manifested in our everyday lives and how the Body Acceptance movement seeks to end it. Participants will learn what Body/Fat Acceptance means and the skills used to learn to love and accept our bodies. The workshop will make a connection between these skills and the skills taught for anxiety management. Participants will learn about the importance of incorporating body acceptance into the treatment of anxiety in women.

 

Levana Slabodnick, LISW-S is the owner and therapist of Silverlinings Psychotherapy, specializing in the treatment of anxiety in women and girls. Levana received her B.A. and MSW at The Ohio State University and post-graduate training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, hypnotherapy, transgender mental and physical health, and LGBTQ issues. Levana is passionate about helping her clients feel empowered and brave, which are characteristics that are often discouraged in women and girls. She lives in Columbus, Ohio with her husband and two kids.


Breakout #8a- Empowering Your Staff to Stand Up: An introduction to transformational leadership

Presenter: Brittany Freese

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Transformational leadership is meant to inspire people to achieve unexpected or remarkable results. It gives staff members autonomy over specific jobs, as well as the authority to make decisions once they have been trained. In this workshop, you'll learn ways to be a transformational leader and empower your staff to stand up and make changes that will improve the quality of care provided to the people you and your staff members serve and help both staff and clients feel responsible and proud of your organization’s success.

 

Brittany Freese is a LISW-S in private practice with experience working with adults in various capacities, including case management, counseling, and supervision in community mental health organizations, addictions clinics, HIV/AIDS service organizations, consumer-run programs, and private practice settings. She also is a Manager of Non-Forensic Case Management at Recovery Resources. Brittany has a BA in Psychology from the University of Toledo and a MSW from New York University.


Breakout #9a- Standing Up for Older Youth in Foster Care: Finding permanent connections and addressing trauma

Presenters: Shannon Deinhart and Stephanie Lariccia

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

In this workshop, we will provide tools for those working with youth who appear destined to age out of the foster care system without supportive emotional connections. We will discuss the importance of using the tools of Family Search and Engagement to aid these vulnerable youth in finding permanent connections, while addressing any underlying trauma that has accumulated along the way.

 

Shannon has 22 years of social work experience in which she has worked to improve permanency and relational outcomes for children and youth in foster care. She has done this work previously at two private agencies and currently with the agency she co-founded in 2005 - the Waiting Child Fund. Shannon believes strongly in collaborating to create partnerships to achieve better outcomes for youth and families who experience the child welfare system. After spending the first 22 years of her professional life as a journalist, Stephanie recently switched career paths and is pursuing a MSW at Case Western Reserve University. An adoptive mother and foster care mentor, Stephanie plans to work with children and families touched by adoption and/or foster care with the aid of a trauma-focused approach.


Breakout B and C- 1:30-3:00 p.m. AND 3:30-5:00 p.m.

3-Hour Workshops


Breakout #10bc- Beyond Cultural Competence, Towards Cultural Advocacy

Presenter: LaToya Logan

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets ethics requirement

 

There have been many iterations of diversity and subsequent initiatives purposed to improve diversity through trainings that raise awareness and provoke meaningful discussions. These discussions are intended to enhance diversity in daily work practice. This belief led to the concept of cultural competence, an assumed comprehensive training on such a complex topic leading many to believe the work is complete. As a result, there has been a lost opportunity to challenge the origins of implicit bias, the application of human inclusion in treatment, and the impact on diagnosing, referrals for treatment, and practice.

 

LaToya Logan, MSSA, LISW-S, CCTP has over 10 years of experience providing supervision, training and program evaluation. LaToya is a seasoned clinician, specializing in trauma, criminal justice, and crisis management. LaToya has conducted trainings for community mental health agencies, mental health boards, and notably, the NASW National Conference.


Breakout #11bc- Is social work going to the dogs? How human-animal collaboration can support social work practice

Presenters: Aviva Vincent and Janet Hoy

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Media has provided an influx of heart-warming stories about animals’ ability to support, love, and encourage us to preserve. As social workers, it is an asset to understand this dynamic and practice. Participants will engage in collaborative discussion about micro and mezzo human-animal interaction (HAI) theoretical understanding, practical strategies, and ethical considerations. Presenters will highlight exemplar national practices and programs for youth and adults. Presenters will partner with local certified animal-assisted interventions/visiting program to support active learning and demonstrate the cathartic and supportive impact of having an animal in practice. At the closure of the session, presenters will share resources for additional information, learning, and practice.

 

Aviva Vincent is a doctoral student at Case Western Reserve University where she is pursing research in HAI with interest in the biological impact of animals on humans, community organizing, program implantation, and evaluation. She is an educator in macro social work and animal-assisted interventions and has certifications with Path International and Therapy Dogs International. Dr. Janey Hoy is faculty at University of Toledo and a practitioner in the public mental health service system and HAI. Research interests include benefits of HAI, facilitators of mental health recovery among individuals with mental illness, and use of qualitative research to inform intervention research. She is co-author of the book Human-Animal Interaction: A Social Work Guide.


Breakout B- 1:30-3:00 p.m.

1.5 Hour Workshops


Breakout #12b- Community Assessments in Nonprofit Planning

Presenters: Andrew Katusin and Kara Porter

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This workshop will review various components of the Community Assessment process, outline their strengths and challenges, and use the recent United Way of Greater Cleveland Community Assessment as an example for process. The group will also discuss the importance of such assessments and how the results can be used to strengthen nonprofits.

 

Andrew received his Master’s from the Mandel School at Case Western and Bachelor’s from Loyola University Chicago. He has worked in clinical practice with adolescents and youth, community and economic development, and strategic grant-making. He is currently the Program Director for Basic Needs at United Way of Greater Cleveland. Kara Porter is the Director of Education with United Way of Greater Cleveland, working with programs serving children and youth. Previously, Kara worked in community engagement for Cleveland Rape Crisis Center. Kara holds a Master’s from the Mandel School at Case Western and a Bachelor’s from Baldwin Wallace University.


Breakout #13b- Millennials and Generation Z: Mental health and therapy

Presenter: Chanté Meadows

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Millennials are experiencing new challenges, from career and economic uncertainty to mountains of debt. Generation Z has experienced the widespread usage of the Internet from a young age; Generation Z is typically thought of as being comfortable with technology and interacting on social media for a significant portion of their socializing. Technology and social media ahve made it harder to live authentic and vulnerable lives. Technology and social media makes everything easy and quick. When a therapist says, “It’s a process,” what does that mean for the concept fast and simple. What does therapy look like for these generations?

 

Chanté Meadows is a licensed clinical social worker, sex therapist, and clinical supervisor in the state of Ohio. Chanté has worked for over 10 years in various positions and roles in the mental health field. She worked with the college population at The Ohio State University Counseling Center for over five years. Chanté now works part-time as a medical social worker at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. But her primary work is owner and private practitioner at Meadows Counseling Group. She manages a caseload of diverse clients with presenting issues such as women’s issues, sexual issues, relationships, anxiety, depression, and more.


Breakout #14b- Understanding and Accommodating Your Client with a History of Traumatic Brain Injury

Presenter: John D. Corrigan

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

While it is estimated that 1 in 5 adults in the general population have had at least one traumatic brain injury (TBI) with loss of consciousness sometime in their life, this prevalence doubles, triples or quadruples in select populations like persons with disabilities, prisoners, or persons dually diagnosed with severe mental illness and substance use disorders. This workshop is designed to assist clinicians working in many settings to understand why TBI presents a unique clinical challenge, screen for problematic histories of TBI, and adapt your interactions and treatment planning to accommodate these individuals’ unique neurobehavioral consequences.

 

John D. Corrigan, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Ohio State University and Director of the Ohio Brain Injury Program, the state’s lead agency for policy and planning related to living with brain injury.



Breakout #15b- Student Fair: Connecting to BSW and MSW Programs

This session is for anyone interested in earning a BSW or MSW to connect to university representatives. This session does not provide CEUs.


Breakout C- 3:30-5:00 p.m.

1.5-Hour Workshops


Breakout #16c- Let's Talk about Sex: Why everyone should be talking about it!

Presenter: Chanté Meadows

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Sex is still a taboo topic and many social workers are not comfortable talking about it. If we as social workers want to treat the whole person, sexual health is just as important as physical health. If social workers become more comfortable speaking about sexual health, our clients will feel more comfortable disclosing very personal information. Sex Talk allows for the social workers to open the door for discussions about facts and statistic for sexually transmitted infections, inter-partner violence, abuse, pain, and sex trafficking. To truly provide adequate holistic care, we cannot continue to avoid this topic.

 

Chanté Meadows is a licensed clinical social worker, sex therapist, and clinical supervisor in the state of Ohio. Chanté has worked for over 10 years in various positions and roles in the mental health field. She worked with the college population at The Ohio State University Counseling Center for over five years. Chanté now works part-time as a medical social worker at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. But her primary work is owner and private practitioner at Meadows Counseling Group. She manages a caseload of diverse clients with presenting issues such as women’s issues, sexual issues, relationships, anxiety, depression, and more.


Breakout #17c- Beyond Treatment As Usual: The case for cognitive remediation

Presenter: Sharon Shumaker

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Why have more individuals with chronic mental health disabilities not recovered more completely? We need to rethink the problem and solution; move the treatment paradigm from treatment as usual (i.e., maintenance style of non-treatment) to Cognitive Remediation, an active treatment focusing on remediating the person’s disabilities while increasing their strengths. CET, a SAMHSA recognized evidence-based practice form of cognitive remediation, has been successfully disseminated to 41 sites in 12 states. The talk will demonstrate how over 48 weekly sessions of computer exercises, social cognition groups, and individual coaching, clients learn how to be socially wise and vocationally effective.

 

Sharon received her MSW from Syracuse University and has worked as a therapist in Central America and in the United States. In 2001 she began working with the Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) program at PLAN of NE Ohio to become certified as a Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) coach. In addition to supervising the CETCLEVELAND trainers, Sharon is the editor of the CETCLEVELAND training material and trains new CETCLEVELAND coaches throughout the county.


Breakout #18c- Who Does the Diagnostic Assessment? Recruiting and Training Social Workers for Best Fit for Primary Care Integration

Presenters: Staci Swenson and Ellen DeFrance

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This presentation offers an overview on the challenges and successes of integrating behavioral health services into the primary care setting.  Tips for recruiting for the best fit and training a clinician for the role of integrated behavioral health specialist will be provided. Further, recommendations will be offered in how to retain clinicians who serve in these complex positions which require a broad skill set.

 

Staci Swenson, MA, MSW, LISW-S is the Director of Behavioral Health and Social Work at PrimaryOne Health, an 11-site federally qualified health center system located in Central Ohio. Her passion for reducing barriers to underserved populations and improving access to high quality behavioral health care has lead her to practice as an administrator, social worker, therapist, educator, and trainer spanning over 15 years. She specializes in behavioral health integration in the primary care setting, crisis intervention, motivational interviewing, and trauma-informed care. Further, she is a community lecturer in the College of Social Work at The Ohio State University and is the education coordinator for PrimaryOne Health which collaborates with the Integrated and Culturally Relevant Care model of field education with the College providing intensive training for 15-20 graduate students a year. Ellen DeFrance also works at PrimaryHealth. Ellen DeFrance, LISW is a Behavioral Health Clinician specializing in integrated care for PrimaryOne Health, a 10-site federally qualified health center system in Central Ohio. In her current role, Ellen coordinates psychiatry programming as well as providing behavioral health service in the primary care setting. In 2014, Ellen graduated from the Integrated and Culturally Relevant Care program, an intensive training internship with the College of Social Work at OSU. Since then, she has been driven to widen access to mental health care treatment in all communities and reducing stigma that is often attached to those services.


Breakout #19c- Caregivers of Veterans: Consideration for special relationships

Presenter: Ann Weaver

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Many veterans who are now being served by the Veteran’s Health Administration have complicated psychosocial factors, which brings individuals without significant or readily available caregivers. This leads to caregivers often being strained to maintain employment while also caring for individuals with serious cognitive impairments and/or physical illnesses. Additional barriers to successful caregiving include mental health, substance abuse, and strained relationships. The strained relationships may be a result of other problems that may or may not be related to the veteran’s military experience. Sometimes the caregivers end up being neighbors, co-workers, or even just acquaintances who have capability to care for veterans.

 

Ann Weaver, MSW, LISW-S, attended the University of Toledo for her Bachelor of Arts degree (1994) and her MSW (2007).  Ann has worked in several settings, including Job and Family Services, Community Mental Health, Inpatient Mental Health, Central Access, PASRR, and Crisis Mental Health services.  Ann has been working in outpatient Primary Care as a Medical Social Worker at the Toledo VA Clinic, since 2009.  In addition to her social work position, Ann participates in a local I-team on the Coalition of Organizations for Protection of Elders in Lucas County, and provides supervision for social workers seeking independent licensure.  She enjoys living with her husband and their two dogs in Toledo.


Breakout #20c- Make Your Voice Heard!

Presenters: Liz Powell and Greg Kapcar

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

You’ll leave this workshop empowered to make a difference after learning how to make your voice heard. The presenters will provide education on raising awareness, advocating, and influencing policy. The workshop will consist of three parts: 1) education on process and tools, 2) interactive exercises, and 3) action planning tailored to your cause/organization.

 

Liz is G2G’s founder and has two decades of experience working on health and social policy in Congress and as an attorney and lobbyist. Since 2007, G2G has raised $153M, shaped legislation, and led bipartisan advocacy campaigns. She has an MPH from Harvard, JD from George Washington, and BA from Colgate. Greg is a social worker and G2G's Public Affairs Manager. He has 20 years of experience leading nonprofits, advocacy campaigns, and policy development concerning children and families. He has an MPA from Cleveland State and BA from Baldwin-Wallace. He works in G2G’s Cleveland and Columbus offices.


Breakout #21c- Standing Up for Social Justice Through Elected Office: Social work skills in the political arena

Presenters: Jenn Angelo and David Miller

1.5 CEUs for social work

 

This workshop highlights transferable and translatable social work skills for seeking political office by social workers. Social workers are uniquely qualified to provide advocacy and advancement of social justice goals within the political arena as elected officials; however, this involvement has been limited across the political spectrum. This workshop will illustrate how social work skills can be applied in campaigning and while serving in office. Practical and actionable skills such as coalition building and active communication will be discussed. Identification of challenges and barriers, which may preclude social workers from seeking office, are highlighted along with strategies to overcome them.

 

Jenn Angelo is a dual degree graduate student (MSSA/MNO) at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. She has a bachelor's degree in Human Development and Family Studies from Bowling Green State University. Currently, Jenn works as the Membership and Development Director at CEOs for Cities. David B. Miller is Associate Professor at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Miller chairs the health specialization and is lead instructor for research. Dr. Miller served on city council for 10 years, six of which as Council President.


Breakout #22c- The Use of Validation to Decrease Clinician Burnout and Increase Behavioral Change in Clients

Presenter: Samantha Mishne

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

In this interactive workshop clinicians will learn how self-validation can decrease burnout and feelings of ineffectiveness. They will also learn about the six levels of validation and how validation can be used to bring about behavioral change.

 

Samantha Mishne graduated from Smith College School of Social Work in 1999. Since that time she has worked with children, adolescents, and adults in multiple treatment settings. For the past eight years she has focused on using dialectical behavioral therapy to treat self-harming and suicidal adolescents and adults. She is also an adjunct faculty member at the Jack, Joseph, ad Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.


Breakout #23c- Writing Your Overnight Success Story

Dorothy Martindale, NASW Ohio Chapter’s membership associate, will present a session on best practices for resumes and cover letters. This session does not count for CEU credit.


Day 2- November 17

Breakout D and E- 11:45 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

3-Hour Workshops


Breakout #24de- Cross-Cultural Social Work Practice and Racial Bias: Using defensiveness, denial, emotional discomfort, and cognitive dissonance as starting points for exploration and change

Presenters: Cherie Bridges Patrick

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)- meets ethics requirement

 

As advocates of social justice, social workers must look at our own racial development, beliefs, practices and multiple intersecting identities that are integrated into our everyday lives. This creates a social work imperative to courageously confront the roadblocks to growth and professional development. “For a deep and lasting equality to evolve, implicit biases must be acknowledged and challenged; to do otherwise is to allow them to haunt our minds, our homes, and our society into the next millennium” (Rudman, 2004). Using thought-provoking cinematography, PowerPoint and group discussion, this introductory session will explore the affective and cognitive discomfort that often appears when confronting our own prejudices, stereotypes, and biases in working with those who are different than ourselves.

 

Cherie leads Paradox Cross-Cultural Consultation, Training and Empowerment, LLC. Paradox offers consultation, training development, and facilitation on topics of racial inequity, cross-cultural mental health, and relational social work. She is a community lecturer in the College of Social Work at The Ohio State University and PhD student in the Antioch Graduate Program of Leadership and Change.


Breakout #25de- Access to Social Services is a Human Right: Social workers’ call to action

Presenters: Jacquelyn C.A. Meshelemiah and Carra Gilson

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

The social work profession has evolved extensively since its inception in 1898. The profession began with a focus on helping others and recognizing social injustices as its core charges. The profession is now being called to view human rights as its professional responsibility too. As driving forces behind this new charge, the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) are taking steps to ensure that the human rights perspective is being integrated into social work education and practice. These measures will be examined here.

 

Jacquelyn Meshelemiah is a licensed social worker who earned her BSSW, MSW, and PhD from OSU. She teaches courses on the DSM-5 and human trafficking. She is the author and co-author of numerous

publications, presentations, and trainings. Her primary research agenda centers on social justice, human rights, and anti-trafficking work. Carra Gilson is an undergraduate at OSU studying Public Health (Minor in Spanish). She is also an Anti-Trafficking Research Assistant in the College of Social Work who examines the intersectionality of public health and social work. Additionally, Carra serves in many volunteer and leadership roles related to promoting holistic wellness.


Breakout #26de- Self-Care and Resilience: An ethical imperative

Presenter: Kelly Stevenson

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets ethics requirement

 

This experiential training will expand the view of self-care past activities we do (or don’t do) to encompass our personal and professional values, and tap into our sense of purpose. Self-care will be examined at all levels of Maslow’s Hierarchy, with evidence-based resilience-building activities suggested for each level.

 

Kelly Stevenson earned her MSW at Florida State University, and is licensed as an Independent Social Worker in Ohio, Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. She is currently employed by the Mount Carmel Crime & Trauma Assistance Program. She has taught courses in social work at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and served on the NASW-TN Chapter Ethics Committee.


Breakout #27de- Leading, Managing, and Motivating: How supervisors actually DO supervision

Presenters: Linda Helm and Richard Boettcher

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets supervision requirement

 

This workshop is based on the presenters’ research of 50 social work supervisors and their styles of leadership, management, and approaches to motivating staff as well as the career paths they have followed to leadership positions. Attendees will be invited to participate in exercises which reflect and demonstrate the findings of the study.

 

Richard Boettcher, PhD, LISW-S is a Professor Emeritus at the College of Social Work at The Ohio State University. He previously served as Dean of the College of Social Work at OSU. Since his retirement he regularly teaches courses on human resource management and supervision. Dr. Boettcher, along with Dr. Helm, developed the nine-hour supervision certificate course program in 2010 for the NASW Ohio Chapter. Dr. Linda Helm, LISW-S is the Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program Partnership Program Coordinator for the College of Social Work at The Ohio State University.


Breakout #28de- Ethical Considerations for Working with Transgender/Gender Diverse Youth & Adolescents

Presenters: Erin Upchurch

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets ethics requirement

 

This training will focus on providing therapeutic and supportive care to transgender/gender diverse youth and adolescents. We will explore the development of gender identity through the lens of child and adolescent developmen; and will discuss ethical considerations within each stage, with a focus on evidence-based models of treatment, intervention, and support.

 

Erin Upchurch, LISW-S is a trauma informed social worker and therapist experienced in working with women, youth and families, and members of minority and traditionally underserved communities. In addition to her therapeutic work, Erin frequently engages in community advocacy and education, and is an experienced facilitator of conversations and trainings on culturally relevant programming and services. Erin is currently Adjunct Faculty at the OSU College of Social Work and in 2015, was appointed by the Mayor to the Columbus Community Relations Commission.


Breakout D- 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

1.5 Hour Workshops


 

Breakout #29d- Developing and Leading an Effective Group

Presenter: Norman F. Shub

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

This workshop is aimed at those who would like to learn a higher level, more effective, and intense way to develop a group process and group. The model presented here can be used in clinical, school, task-oriented, and any other group process where the members need to learn to work together effectively for their development or the collective development of the group.

 

Norman Shub is an author, teacher and psychotherapist who is a leader in the guiding of individuals, couples, families and communities toward solutions. His clear and articulate approach has earned him the distinctions of master teacher and psychotherapy trainer. Norman’s pioneering work in psychotherapy is reflected in his REAL Press Publications, which are used by therapists at numerous universities and institutes around the world. For more than 35 years, Norman has been clinical director of Gestalt Associates and the Gestalt Institute of Central Ohio. He also served on the editorial board of several professional journals.


Breakout #30d- Stand up to Eating Disorders: Don't let your mind bully your body

Presenters: Emily Harpur, Rashel Krankovich, and Elise Knueven

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

In this workshop we will discuss myths vs. facts of adolescent eating disorders and educate on factors impacting eating disorders. We will discuss how to challenge society’s impression of eating disorders to help reduce stigma. Discussion will also include the role of social media in the evelopment of eating disorders. We will also discuss how to empower adolescents with body image and self-confidence.

 

Emily Harpur, LISW-S is a graduate of Notre Dame University and received her MSW from Ohio State University. Emily has been practicing at Nationwide Children’s Hospital Eating Disorders Clinic for three years where she has worked with a variety of adolescents and families in overcoming eating disorders. Rashel Krankovich, LISW currently works at Nationwide Children’s Hospital Eating Disorders Clinic where she is a counselor in the Intensive Outpatient Program. Rashel previously worked on the Youth Crisis Stabilization Unit working with adolescents coping with depression and anxiety. She continues to develop professional skills in working with high-risk populations. Elise Knueven is a licensed social worker who graduated with an MSW from OSU. She interned at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and spent a year working at the Eating Disorder Program in the Outpatient Program, Intensive Outpatient Program, and Partial Hospitalization Program. She is currently working as an PHP therapist.


Breakout #31d- What Social Workers Need to Know about the Guardianship Rules: A culture change

Presenters: Amy Roberts and Julia Nack

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Recent changes in adult guardianship regulations and practices affect many aspects of social work. In this session, we will share the most up to date information on rules for adult guardianship and provide advice on how Social Workers can work with guardians and persons under guardianship (also known as “wards”). We will also discuss how Rule 66 is an important step in changing the culture of adult guardianship, moving from a philosophy of control to one of support for person-centered care. Furthermore, we will present some innovative practices in adult guardianship taking place in Ohio as models that may enhance adult guardianship practices within your communities.

 

Amy Restorick Roberts, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Family Science and Social Work at Miami University and a Research Fellow at the Scripps Gerontology Center in Oxford, Ohio. Her scholarship aims to improve the quality of life of older people and strengthen systems of long-term care services and supports. Julia Nack is a Nationally Certified Master Guardian. She currently works as the Director of the Volunteer Guardianship Program at the Central Ohio Area Agency on Aging.


Breakout #32d- Student Fair: Connecting to PhD Programs

This session is for anyone interested in earning a PhD or DSW to connect to university representatives. This session does not provide CEUs.


Breakout E and F- 1:30-3:00 p.m. AND 3:30-5:00 p.m.

3-Hour Workshops


Breakout #33ef- Solution Focused Brief Therapy 101

Presenters: Rebekka Ouer and Paula Lange

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This workshop will introduce participants to Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) and its unique place in social work practice. It will honor the two social workers who developed the approach and educate its participants on the evolution of SFBT over the past 30 years. Further, it will take its participants directly through the first SFBT session. It will cover the questions asked and the assumptions behind the model and its development. The presenters will allow participants to practice some of the techniques with each other as well as hold a Q&A at the end of the presentation.

 

Rebekka Ouer is a clinical social worker, supervisor, author, and adjunct professor who owns a private practice in Dallas, Texas. She authored the book from Routledge Publications entitled, Solution Focused Brief Therapy with the LGBT Community: Creating Futures through Hope and Resilience. She has also taught Masters level social work students at UT Arlington. Paula Lange is a psychotherapist who practices SFBT in private practice and community mental health in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her SFBT training is through BRIEF International. She is currently participating in research with Dr. Adam Froerer in order to increase the growing evidence base of SFBT.


Breakout #34ef- Getting to the Core of the Problem: Treating the cause, not the symptom

Presenters: Roy Kiessling

3 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Psychotherapy has recently placed a greater emphasis on the trauma-informed approach to case conceptualization and treatment. Advances in neurobiology have supported the hypothesis that past disturbing or traumatic events are stored differently in the brain than normal events. These neural networks carry a higher emotional charge than normal events. Because of this emotional encoding, linkage, binding and reconsolidation of these neural networks with adaptive neural networks becomes more difficult. The focus of psychotherapy is to accomplish network reconsolidation. Events create emotions, which in turn are verbalized as core beliefs. Mapping out both negative and positive networks helps clarify case conceptualization and treatment intervention strategies. Addressing the core beliefs and their emotional encoding provides an effective and efficient foundation for case conceptualization and treatment. This workshop will discuss the neurobiology of memory, the process of identifying core beliefs and their use in case conceptualization and treatment.

 

Roy Kiessling, LISW is the founder of EMDR Consulting, a national EMDR training organization. Roy teaches a belief-focused, neurological perspective to case conceptualization and treatment. This approach helps clinicians identify and focus on the core cause of the problem, not just the presenting symptom.


Breakout E- 1:30-3:00 p.m.

1.5-Hour Workshops


Breakout #35e- Whatever happened to good old community organization and advocacy? Saving 396 HUD subsidized units from foreclosure

Presenters: Alice Skirtz and Josh Spring

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

As social work community organization and advocacy are largely absent from the social work generalist practice body of knowledge, social workers who attempt to stand up for clients in jeopardy of losing permanent housing must develop organizing and advocacy practices to respond to current injustices for clients resulting from market economies. A case example details the foreclosure of 396 HUD-subsidized units owned and neglected by an out-of-state landlord placing the tenants at risk of homelessness, and the social work community organization and advocacy responses drawn from legacy social work.

 

Alice Skirtz, PhD, LISW-S has more than 45 years of social work experience in direct practice, supervision/administration, and advocacy and community activism with poor populations and neighborhoods. She is the author of Econocide: Elimination of the Urban Poor published by NASW Press. Josh Spring, BSW, LSW has been the Executive Director of the Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition since 2009, a coalition of 70 organizations serving those who experience homelessness, neighborhood groups, and individual advocates working to eradicate homelessness. Experienced in advocacy and community activism, he previously worked with permanent and transitional housing programs.


Breakout #36e- Trotting Ahead: Refining the intervention and outcomes of equine-assisted therapy for older adults

Presenters: Holly Jedlicka, Holly Dabelko-Schoeny, and KyongWeon “Kathy” Lee

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

Researchers from The Ohio State University’s College of Social Work and College of Veterinary Medicine partnered with National Church Residences and PBJ Connections to provide a six-week EAGALA model equine-assisted psychotherapy intervention. Presenters will discuss different strategies for partnerships between university and organizations, implementation strategies to meet the needs of frail older adults in the community using EAGALA model equine assisted psychotherapy, and importance of social workers’ roles in animal-assisted therapy.

 

Holly Jedlicka is the co-founder and Executive Director of PBJ Connections, which provides professional behavioral health therapy to children, adults and families through horses, counseling and nature. Holly specializes in child and family therapy, trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, and has a passion for equine assisted psychotherapy. KyongWeon “Kathy” Lee is a PhD candidate at The Ohio State University’s College of Social Work. Her research interests are focused around productive aging, and she has been a research assistant and co-investigator on several projects with older adults. Dr. Holly Dabelko-Schoeny is an Associate Professor of Social Work at The Ohio State University. She is an accomplished researcher and is well published in the literature on older adults and aging.


Breakout #37e- Standing Up to Intimate Partner Violence

Presenters: Rebecca Cline, Sandra Ortega, and Justin Carter

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This workshop will engage participants in an exploration of strategies designed to prevent intimate partner violence that are being implemented by the Ohio Domestic Violence Network. Presenters will highlight the Ohio Men’s Action Network and the importance of men’s leadership for preventing violence as well as partnerships with several Ohio campuses involved with Creating Safer Ohio Campuses. A focus of discussion will be about how these separate strategies have become intertwined as well as the use of evaluation data for program improvement. Participants will engage using technology to answer related polling questions as well as interacting in small group discussions.

 

Rebecca Cline, MSW, LISW-S is the 2014 Ohio Chapter NASW Lifetime Achievement Award recipient and Prevention Programs Director for the Ohio Domestic Violence Network. She is directly accountable for the CDC funded DELTA FOCUS* Project, a local, statewide and national primary prevention of intimate partner violence initiative. Sandra Ortega, PhD, is an evaluation consultant and President of Sandra Ortega, Consulting. Since 2007 she has worked with the Ohio Domestic Violence Network providing empowerment evaluation coaching and assistance. Dr. Ortega also consults with the Ohio Department of Health to assist with evaluation of the Rape Prevention Education program. Justin Carter is the Engaging Men Coordinator for the Ohio Domestic Violence Network. Currently, he is a senior at The Ohio State University College of Social Work. Justin has a passion for social change and social justice work and has worked on campus to promote men’s engagement in sexual violence prevention since 2015.


 

Breakout F- 3:30-5:00 p.m.

1.5-Hour Workshops


Breakout #38f- Reclaiming Our Radical Roots

Presenter: Rachael Richter

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

It is inspirational to remember our radical predecessors as we explore how to ‘Stand Up’ as a profession. While some may know social work pioneers such as Jane Addams, Mary Richmond, Frances Perkins and Jeannette Rankin, this history lesson bears repeating. In addition, numerous courageous others have worked tirelessly to develop policies, provide services to marginalized populations, improve overall human well-being, and support the development of professional social work education. This session will present interesting information about some of our radical professional history and stimulate ideas about how we can re-energize our passion to make a difference.

 

Rachael is currently an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Western New Mexico University and a second-year DSW student at St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas. She has 25 years of social work practice experience and has been teaching in higher education since 1998.


Breakout #39f- Horticulture Based Interventions and Program Development

Presenter: Jonathan Trauth

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

By connecting both Medicaid and non Medicaid therapeutic horticulture programs participants will learn the practical use of horticulture therapy with clients in groups or individually to meet treatment goals and objectives while collaborating with medicaid funded agencies. Participants will learn how to use the information in tangible and metaphoric applications to assist their clients in achieving clinical outcomes. The overarching model presented is related primarily towards a public health model catering to prevention (e.g., episodic mental health illness, physical lethargy, social isolation, and stagnation of learning), treatment (e.g., who, what, where, and how), and maintenance (self-sufficiency).

 

Dr. Trauth is a lecturer in the Department of Counseling, Social Work & Leadership at NKU. Dr. Trauth began working in substance abuse dependency counseling in inner city Lexington, KY, while working on his MSW at the University of Kentucky. He completed his Doctorate in Counseling at the University of Cincinnati in 2016.


Breakout #40f- Social Work Ethics and Organizational Culture: Impact on social work field education

Presenter: Stephanie A Bradford

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets ethics requirement

 

Social work ethics and an understanding of organizational culture is imperative to students’ learning in field education. Integrating classroom learning, theoretical concepts, practice skills and ethics, while also encountering and experiencing agency milieu, organizational culture, and climate, occur in the field education placement. Student acculturation to the profession, ethical behavior and practice are impacted by organizational culture during field education. Using the ecological framework, this workshop will address the importance of understanding this relationship to enhance social work learning, ethical practice, and need for incorporating organizational culture to ethics education for field education.

 

Stephanie is a doctoral student at St. Catherine University and the University of St. Thomas and will receive the DSW in May 2018. She is a clinical therapist at Crisis Intervention and Recovery Center, Vista Psychological and Counseling Centre and is an adjunct professor at Malone University. Her areas of practice include child welfare, adoption, mental health with chronic mental and emotional disorders, supervision and ethics.


Breakout #41f- Providing Culturally Humble Care to the Trans and Gender Non-Conforming Community

Presenter: Ramona Peel

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval) - meets ethics requirement

 

Trans and Gender Non-Conforming (TGNC) Americans are an increasingly visible population who have a disproportionate need for health and wellness services of all kinds. The TGNC community also suffers from a variety of health disparities, but are less likely to have access to care, and less likely to stay linked to care. This workshop offers an introduction to the TGNC community, an explanation of the health disparities suffered by this community (and why those disparities persist), and practical tips on how to create a welcoming and inclusive client experience that will help keep TGNC people linked to care.

 

As the Lead Trainer for The Institute for LGBTQ Health Equity, Ramona is directly involved in The Institute’s education, research, and community engagement programs. She collaborates on creating The Institute’s training programs, and leads the delivery of training to internal and external audiences. Ramona also is a Political Science instructor, and currently teaches at the Newark branch of The Ohio State University. Ramona has 15 years of classroom teaching experience, and her work was recognized by the Ohio State University Political Science Department, which awarded her Henry R. Spencer Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2004. Her varied background and experience also includes social science research, broadcasting, journalism, and activism. In April 2016, she was guest editor for that month’s issue of (614) Magazine. In addition, her lived experience as a trans woman informs and enriches her work. Ramona has a B.A. and M.A. in Political Science from Western Washington University, where she graduated Cum Laude in 1997. She lives in the Clintonville neighborhood of Columbus and has two wonderful, supportive children. She is a lifelong Seattle Seahawks fan and Star Wars geek.


Breakout #42f- Leading from the Middle: How to have an impact from the middle of an organizational hierarchy

Presenters: Tiffany Lombardo

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This session will focus on basic leadership principles while acknowledging and promoting growth from a low-level or mid-level supervisor/management position within an organization. Emotional Intelligence will be reviewed, as well as various leadership styles and how to apply them successfully. There will be a focus on development of social workers and advocacy for the social services from within organizations. Participants will leave with a personal mission statement and the tools to create goals for their own professional development.

 

Tiffany Lombardo received a BA in Sociology from Xavier University and a MA in Social Service Administration from the University of Chicago. She currently serves as the Director of Addiction Services for the Butler County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery Services Board. Tiffany’s experience includes public, non-profit and for-profit organizations working with various populations and sectors, including children and adolescents, drug addicted adults, and criminal justice populations.


Breakout #43f- Children and Trauma: School problems and delinquency

Presenter: Christopher A. Mallett

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This workshop reviews the multiple types of traumas that impact children and adolescents – maltreatment, poor and unsafe neighborhoods, bullying and cyberbullying, violent deaths, and witnessing violence, among others. The impact of these traumas are explored as to how school learning and success is impacted, as well as how these traumatic experiences greatly increase the risk for the development of delinquent behaviors and involvement with the juvenile courts. A majority of those under juvenile court supervision have significant trauma histories, experiences that often times continue in juvenile justice (and adult) correctional facilities. Many of these young people will develop the mental health problem called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) because of these trauma difficulties and their comorbid impact. However, many children and adolescents are also resilient to the impact of these problems, something that is important in the treatment of adolescent trauma.

 

Christopher A. Mallett, Professor of Social Work, teaches research methods, statistics, program evaluation, and mental health policy graduate and undergraduate courses at Cleveland State University. Dr. Mallett is licensed in Ohio as a social worker and attorney, and has a long history of working with, advocating for, and representing vulnerable children, adolescents, and their families. His research and scholarship focuses on disability law, juvenile delinquency, and young people with certain difficulties and their involvement with the juvenile justice system and school discipline protocols; specifically the impact of mental health disorders, substance abuse, special education disabilities, and trauma experiences/maltreatment victimizations. As a consultant whose expertise is nationally tapped by juvenile courts, school districts, and children’s service agencies, Dr. Mallett has published over 55 research papers, book chapters, and technical assistance training briefs, as well as three books on these topics.


Breakout #44f- Making Relapse Work for You and the Client

Presenters: Edward J. Magiste and Sadigoh Galloway

1.5 CEUs for social work, counseling, and chemical dependency (pending approval)

 

This experiential workshop will approach relapse dynamics, reframing them as a powerful therapeutic tool for recovery. Participants will explore the concepts behind relapse, understand the implications that they have for recovery, apply new viewpoints to cases, and evaluate effectiveness of this approach. This workshop is appropriate for anyone working with clients who are addicted, as well as dual diagnosis clients.

 

Ed Magiste began his social work career in the early 1980s working in chemical dependency, and then in the HIV/AIDS service sector. Dr. Magiste is currently an adjunct faculty member at Cleveland State University. Sadigoh Galloway is a clinical supervisor at the Catholic Charities Diocese of Cleveland in their chemical dependency treatment program. She has worked with the dual diagnosed client population for several years. She recently earned her MSW.


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